Appearing JLF Doha, Qatar

JLF Doha, Qatar: Dec 12-14

 

I’m excited to be heading to Qatar soon for JLF Doha. Here are my events at the Qatar National Library.

Fri 13th, 6:20 PM TO 7:05 PM, SPECIAL EVENT AREA 

Writing Conflict: Paul McVeigh, Ahmad Dallal, and Prayaag Akbar in conversation

In a world fraught with conflict, eminent writers speak of how they make sense of the disturbances and dystopias around us. Prayaag Akbar’s award-winning novel Leila, adapted into a popular Netflix series, addresses the ongoing conflicts in society. Paul McVeigh’s debut novel, The Good Son, tells the story of the Irish Troubles in turbulent Belfast. Writer and academic Ahmed Dallal has examined the conflicts of the Middle East.

2:55 PM TO 3:40 PM AUDITORIUM

What is Not Said:​​​​​​​ Celebrating the Short Story: Alex Shaw, Kaltam Jabor M. Al-kuwari and Paul McVeigh in conversation

The brevity of short fiction, illuminating transformative moments in life, eliminating all that is unnecessary, takes it to the heart of the reader. A session which investigates and celebrates the form and function of the short story. Conversations and contextual readings featuring Alex Shaw, author of the popular Aidan Snow SAS series, Kaltam Jabor M. Al-kuwari, the first Qatari women to author a collection of short stories, and Paul McVeigh, author of The Good Son and director and co-founder of London Short Story Festival, Paul McVeigh.

 

I hope to see some of you in Doha!

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Me, John Boyne, Kit de Waal & Roddy Doyle

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Well, this is a corker.

The Politics Of Fiction

Date Saturday 15 June 2019
Time 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Price£12 | £10
Venue: The Crescent Arts Centre

A Panel Discussion With Roddy Doyle, John Boyne & Kit De Waal Chaired By Paul McVeigh

Do fiction writers have a responsibility to engage with politics? The line between fiction and nonfiction is constantly blurred, especially in the post-truth climate of today. Fiction reflects the world around us, and the world around us at this particular moment in time is in crisis: politically, socially and culturally.

And so, in this tumultuous political climate, this panel will raise, and attempt to answer questions such as, whether fiction writers hold a responsibility to engage with and write about politics?; whether fiction can affect politics?; and whether all fiction is political?

Making up stories is an inherently political act, but that doesn’t mean that the stories are about politics. Does fiction have the ability to change minds? Come and enter into the conversation with these four writers as they discuss and shed light upon a question of pressing importance.

Hope to see some of you there.