The Good Friday Agreement 20 years

With all the Brexit uncertainty around the anniversary of The Good Friday Agreement here’s my essay on the Norther Irish border with south, the borders within Belfast and the borders that exist in our minds.

Cork World Book Festival

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Winner of The Polari Prize & The McCrea Literary Award
“I devoured it in a day, but I’ve thought about it for many, many more.” Lisa McInerney
“A triumph of storytelling. An absolute gem.” Donal Ryan

Judging the SEÁN Ó FAOLÁIN INTERNATIONAL SHORT STORY PRIZE

The closing date is Tuesday the 31st of July (midnight).
First Prize: €2,000, a week-long residency at Anam Cara Retreat and publication in the literary journal Southword.
Second Prize: €500 and publication in Southword.
Four more shortlisted entries will be selected for publication in Southword and receive a publication fee of €120.


About the competition
The Seán Ó Faoláin Short Story Competition is an annual short story competition open to writers from around the world, submissions accepted from March to July annually. It is dedicated to one of Ireland’s most accomplished story writers and theorists and is sponsored by the Munster Literature Centre.
If the winner comes to Cork to collect their prize the centre will pay for hotel accommodation, meals and drinks at the Cork International Short Story Festival (September 12-15, 2018) – Ireland’s only dedicated short story festival.
Anam Cara Writer’s and Artist’s Retreat www.anamcararetreat.com is again awarding a week-long residency to the first prize winner of the Seán Ó Faoláin Short Story Competition. Located just outside the colourful village of Eyeries on the Beara Peninsula in West Cork, Anam Cara is a tranquil spot structured to provide support and sanctuary for people working in the creative arts. It offers private and common working rooms as well as five acres of walking paths, thirty-four nooks and crannies, a river cascades and a river island, gardens, and a labyrinth meadow. Editoral consultation is also available. The additional prize is valued at €700.
(The dates of the residency will be arranged between the writer themselves and Anam Cara, and can be scheduled before or after the week of the Cork International Short Story Festival. Otherwise, the week can be scheduled for another time of the year, at Anam Cara’s discretion.)
The Munster Literature Centre is a not-for-profit organisation; all moneys raised from the competition benefits writers and writing.

nd year I’m judging –

Word limit: 3,000 words
Closing date: Tuesday the 31st of July (midnight)
Entry fee: €15 per story
The competition is open to original, unpublished and unbroadcast short stories in the English language of 3,000 words or fewer. The story can be on any subject, in any style, by a writer of any nationality, living anywhere in the world. Translated work is not in the scope of this competition.
First Prize: €2,000, a week-long residency at Anam Cara Retreat and publication in the literary journal Southword
Second Prize: €500 and publication in Southword
Four more shortlisted entries will be selected for publication
in Southword and receive a publication fee of €120.

CLICK TO SUBMIT

About the competition
The Seán Ó Faoláin Short Story Competition is an annual short story competition open to writers from around the world, submissions accepted from March to July annually. It is dedicated to one of Ireland’s most accomplished story writers and theorists and is sponsored by the Munster Literature Centre.

If the winner comes to Cork to collect their prize the centre will pay for hotel accommodation, meals and drinks at the Cork International Short Story Festival (September 12-15, 2018) – Ireland’s only dedicated short story festival.
Anam Cara Writer’s and Artist’s Retreat www.anamcararetreat.com is again awarding a week-long residency to the first prize winner of the Seán Ó Faoláin Short Story Competition. Located just outside the colourful village of Eyeries on the Beara Peninsula in West Cork, Anam Cara is a tranquil spot structured to provide support and sanctuary for people working in the creative arts. It offers private and common working rooms as well as five acres of walking paths, thirty-four nooks and crannies, a river cascades and a river island, gardens, and a labyrinth meadow. Editoral consultation is also available. The additional prize is valued at €700.
(The dates of the residency will be arranged between the writer themselves and Anam Cara, and can be scheduled before or after the week of the Cork International Short Story Festival. Otherwise, the week can be scheduled for another time of the year, at Anam Cara’s discretion.)
The Munster Literature Centre is a not-for-profit organisation; all moneys raised from the competition benefits writers and writing.

Dylan Thomas Prize 2018: A Shortlist Celebration

Intl. Dylan Thomas Prize 2018: A Shortlist Celebration at British Library

With live readings from the shortlisted writers

Tuesday, May 8 at 7:15 PM – 8:45 PM

The annual Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize is one of the most prestigious awards for young writers. It encourages raw creative talent worldwide and celebrates international literary excellence. I’m honoured to be one of this year’s judges.

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Launched in 2006, the £30,000 Prize is awarded to best published literary work in the English language written by an author aged 39 or under. The 2017 winner was Fiona Macfarlane for her critically acclaimed collection of short stories, The High Places.

Join us for live readings from shortlisted authors and an audience Q&A, just a few days before this year’s prize is awarded.
This year’s shortlisted writers are:

DTP

Zambian-born poet, MC and music producer Kayo Chingonyi (31) for his debut collection of poetry ‘Kumakanda’, which explores the rites of passage boys go through to become men, the intersection of masculinity and race and what it means to be British and not British, all at once.

Cuban-American short-story writer Carmen Maria Machado’s (31) debut short story collection ‘Her Body & Other Parties’ explores the eroticism, violence and emotion of the female experience through a potent mix of science fiction, ghost stories and fairytales.

Six-time British novelist Gwendoline Riley (39) has been shortlisted for ‘First Love’, a compelling tale of toxic love and poisonous partnerships which has been shortlisted for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction and the Goldsmiths Prize.

Irish debut novelist and Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Sally Rooney (27) has been called the ‘Salinger for the Snapchat generation’ for her runaway success ‘Conversations with Friends’

Debut American novelist Emily Ruskovich (33) is shortlisted for her thriller hit Idaho, which tells the story of a mother suddenly killing her six-year-old daughter.

American thriller author Gabriel Tallent (30) has been shortlisted for his debut novel ‘My Absolute Darling,’ called ‘the year’s must-read novel’ by The Times and ‘a masterpiece’ by Stephen King.

Tuesday, May 8 at 7:15 PM – 8:45 PM

Price:
Full Price: £10.00
Member: £10.00
Senior 60+: £8.00
Student: £7.00
Registered Unemployed: £7.00
Under 18: £7.00
Friend of the British Library: £10.00

Enquiries:
+44 (0)1937 546546
boxoffice@bl.uk

A Writer’s Life For Me

It’s been quite a week!

I flew to London last Thursday to teach a class The Author & Social Media and to read at an event A Novel Affair, both at the Irish Cultural Centre. It was a great class, and the event went really well – after readings from the authors, there was a long and interesting Q&A from the audience made up of writers.

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Alan McMonagle and me

On Friday I interviewed Booker-winner Anne Enright at the biggest bookshop in Europe, Waterstones Piccadilly. The packed event was a real insight to Enright’s writing process and I’ve never heard her read so well.

Anne Enright and me

After a sold-out class in Lewes on Saturday I went to Brighton where The Good Son was the City Reads and to see old friends.

I was back in London on Monday for meetings with my old pal and BBC National Short Story Award-winner KJ Orr and my agent Carrie Kania.

On Tuesday I went Swansea in Wales for the shortlisting meeting for the Dylan Thomas Prize and got to meet some of the panel. The next day I taught at Swansea University before flying back to Belfast.

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It’s wonderful traveling around doing interesting work and meeting fascinating people but there are times when a night in your own bed is priceless. So, after a day at home I’m heading off now to Dublin for the weekend. I’m delighted to be reading at The Franco-Irish Literary Festival with events taking place at the Alliance Francaise and Dublin Castle. You can download the programme and come along to see Rob Doyle, Lisa McInerney and Anne Enright – the events are free!

You can check my other upcoming events in the flyer below. Come up and say hello!

March-June 2018

Teaching: ‘That Killer First Page’, Lewes. 17 March – St. Patrick’s Day

We are thrilled to have award-winning novel and short story writer Paul McVeigh join us on Saturday 17 March in Lewes for a two-hour session exploring ‘that killer first page’. Many of you will know Paul from his novel ‘The Good Son‘, from his hugely popular website sharing writing advice and opportunities, and from his work with organisations like London Short Story Festival and Word Factory.
About the Session
We will explore what goes into writing that perfect first page to keep readers (and judges, agents and editors) hooked. How can we create emotional impact? What works and what doesn’t? We’ll find out what competition judges and journal editors look for in a short story. How can we keep their attention and avoid the rejection pile? We will look at editing techniques, from how to know where to begin your story to taking it to the depths it needs. Finally, the session will also look at submission opportunities; how to find them and where you should be sending your work.
Note: Paul’s masterclass starts at 2pm, but we are opening the room from 1pm for anyone who would like an hour working on their first pages (or any other work) in preparation for the session.
About Paul
Paul McVeigh’s short fiction has appeared in journals, anthologies and on BBC Radio 3, 4 & 5. ‘Hollow’ was shortlisted for Short Story of the Year at the Irish Book Awards 2017. Paul’s short story blog, which shares writing opportunities and advice, is about to reach 2 million visits. His debut novel, The Good Son, has won 2 awards in the UK and his writing has been translated into 7 languages. He is the co-founder of London Short Story Festival, associate director at Word Factory, the UK’s national organisation for excellence in the short story, and he judges international short story competitions. Paul interviews short story writers such as Kevin Barry and George Saunders for The Irish Times.
Practicalities

The masterclass will be held in the Quaker Meeting House in Lewes, by the Library. Some of you will know this from our Thursday writing sessions. There is a kitchen in the room and refreshments will be available. The venue is a short 5-10 min walk from both Lewes Train Station and Bus Station. You can park for two hours in the car park behind Premier Inn, or three hours for free in Tesco (10 min walk). There are plenty of cafes and shops around if you need anything before we begin. The room has wheelchair access – let us know in advance so we can make sure the ramp is down.

Any other questions don’t hesitate to email us lewesshortstoryclub@gmail.com or visit our website www.lewesshortstory.co.ukWe look forward to seeing you there!

Date and Time: Sat 17 March. 2pm – 4pm.

Location:  The Classroom, Quaker Meeting House, 8-15 Friars Walk, Lewes, BN7 2LE, View Map

PaulMcVeigh short story

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Winner of The Polari Prize
“Pungently funny and shot through with streaks of aching sadness.” Patrick Gale
“I devoured it in a day, but I’ve thought about it for many, many more.” Lisa McInerney
“Funny, raw and endlessly entertaining.” Johnathan Coe

“The profits from publishing: authors’ perspective” by Nicola Solomon

“The profits from publishing: authors’ perspective”

by Nicola Solomon

I recently did an event for the Royal Society of Literature on Can Literature Solve Poverty? Nicola Solomon of the Society of Authors as there and she has quoted me in an article in the Bookseller about authors’ earnings.

“With these figures how can we encourage new and diverse voices into the industry? Author Paul McVeigh says: “Working-class writers can’t afford to take up a career in writing, it is considered elitist and too risky. Families with uncertain incomes often expect their children to leave education earlier and to support them, and press them to get a ‘proper’ job rather than rely on writing.”

Read the full article here.

The Good Son 3rd Editon

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Winner of The Polari Prize
“Pungently funny and shot through with streaks of aching sadness.” Patrick Gale
“I devoured it in a day, but I’ve thought about it for many, many more.” Lisa McInerney
“Funny, raw and endlessly entertaining.” Johnathan Coe